https://www.factum-arte.com

The Sphere of Things to Come

2020

Facebook Twitter

The Sphere of Things to Come is made up of small white ceramic forms recalling bleached vertebrae, applied to the surface of a sphere. The ceramic forms were made and supplied by Fernando Casasempere, and have appeared in many of his recent works; he sees them as signifiers or artefacts of the changing climate and its effects on the surface of the earth. 
 

© Oak Taylor Smith for Factum Arte


In order to create the sculpture, it was first necessary to design an inner structure capable of evenly distributing and supporting the estimated weight of the final sphere (which has a diameter of 100cm) while resting on a circular base of only 16cm. The result is a delicate sculpture which gives the illusion of self-balance while in fact relying on careful internal engineering.

R&D stage were we tested different possible binding and finish materials © Oak Taylor Smith for Factum Arte

 

A miniature model of the structure supporting the piece horizontally during the assembly phase © Óscar Parasiego for Factum Arte

The polystyrene sphere being CNC-milled © Oak Taylor Smith for Factum Arte


The ceramic pieces were then glued one by one to a CNC-milled polystyrene core, which had been coated in epoxy and fiberglass to improve adherence to the initial “layer” of ceramic pieces. Factum’s artesans used then a syringe to glue the pieces to the sphere, a long process resembling the assembly of a puzzle: the structure had to be carefully balanced at all stages and retain a sense of overall uniformity despite the fact that each ceramic form is unique.

Javi Barreno Pérez and Silvia Álvarez working on the first layer of ceramic pieces © Oak Taylor Smith for Factum Arte

Javi Barreno Pérez glueing the ceramic pieces using a syringe © Oak Taylor Smith for Factum Arte

Corrado Inturri glueing the ceramic pieces using a syringe © Oak Taylor Smith for Factum Arte

A small removable section on top of the sphere allows an attachment to be appended, making it possible to move the sculpture without breaking the fragile ceramic pieces. 

The detachable piece at the top of the sculpture allows the screwing of a steel eyebolt to safely lift the piece © Oak Taylor Smith for Factum Arte

© Oak Taylor Smith for Factum Arte

© Oak Taylor Smith for Factum Arte

© Oak Taylor Smith for Factum Arte

This website uses cookies to improve your experience online. By using our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, read our Privacy & Cookie Policies. Close