News


Jan Hendrix at the MUAC
Jan Hendrix at the MUAC

Since 2018, Factum Arte has been developing and coordinating the production of a series of works with Dutch artist Jan Hendrix that will be on display at the Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo (MUAC) in Mexico City. The exhibition will run from May 5th to September 22nd 2019, before going on tour the following year.

To find out more about the previous works produced at Factum in collaboration with Hendrix, please click here.


Rachid Koraïchi at Casa Arabe
Rachid Koraïchi at Casa Arabe

Factum Arte is delighted to collaborate with the Casa Árabe for Rachid Koraïchi's first exhibition in Spain; entitled "This Long Journey into Your Gaze", the exhibit present several series of bronze sculptures, corten artworks and alabaster tablets all produced at Factum's workshops over the past months. Only a few days ago, Factum's workshop was filled with 700 water-jet cut 'figures' seemingly solely composed of gestural Arabic characters that will now spread across the Neo-Mudéjar building located at the heart of Madrid.

Opening on the 20th March 2019, more details on the official inaugaration can be found on the Facebook event.


Grayson Perry's star pins for Stonewall UK
Grayson Perry's star pins for Stonewall UK

Frequent Factum collaborator Grayson Perry was commissioned by Stonewall to design a pin badge celebrating the 30th anniversary of the British charity to be auctioned at their flagship ‘Equality Dinner’. A limited edition of 10 pieces were then produced at Factum Arte to form one of the top prizes at the fundraising event, which took place on March 14th 2019.

Details on the process, which involved 3D printing and injection of pigment-mixed resin, can be found here.


Hrair Sarkissian's 'Residue' (2019)
Hrair Sarkissian's 'Residue' (2019)

This work, commissioned by the Syrian artist for the 2019 Sharjah Art Biennial, began life with a chance discovery in a Damascus second-hand photography shop: a pile of silver gelatin negatives stuffed into a dusty white plastic bag, hidden away from sight.

Consisting of studio portraits from the 1950s to the 1970s, Sarkissian realised the unique beauty of these aged negatives that, although not of the highest photographic quality, portrays individuals of the past as well as “hint at the world they created and the time they were living in”.

An image from this collection was selected by Sarkissian, “a head-and-shoulders portrait of a woman in the prime of her life looking far into the unknown”, and given to Factum Arte to be scanned and enlarged (with the same proportions) as a large sculptural object measuring 113 cm wide, 193.5 cm high, and 8 cm thick.

Further information on the production of this sculpture can be found here.


'Factum Fetishes' by Mariana Cook
'Factum Fetishes' by Mariana Cook

On the morning of the 1st March, the American photographer Mariana Cook presented her new series at a private viewing hosted by Factum Arte: 13 black-and-white images inspired by the fascinating variety of patterns and textures unintentionally thrust upon the tools and objects in use throughout Factum's workshop, ranging from a painter's vest, cast salt, and a butcher's knife.

The prints were formed through aquatinted copper plates being printed upon 300 gsm Somerset Satin paper with Charbonnel etching ink, producing the deep black in each print. The shape of the object, untouched by the inked plate, was then coated with clear gelatin over which a digital pigment print was precisely registered on Factum Arte's flatbed printer. The digitally printed elements were coated with a UV resistant varnish in order to enchance the difference between the black of the background and the tonal subtley of the 'fetishes', adding a physical dimension to the images.

These were shown alongside a group of large-scale photographs by Cook, printed on gesso-coated aluminium, depicting kamenitzas (indents in limestone that accumalate water and create the conditions for life) in Western Ireland and glacial erratics in New Zealand.


Save the Whitechapel Bell Foundry
Save the Whitechapel Bell Foundry

We need your help!

The Whitechapel Bell Foundry was the oldest continuous manufacturing business in Great Britain until its closure in 2017, a history of traditional bell casting that stretched back almost 450 years to 1570, counting Big Ben and the Liberty Bell amongst its extraordinary legacy.

Sold to Raycliff Capital due to financial pressure in an industry on the decline in the modern age, the US property developers have submitted plans to turn the historic foundry into a ‘bell-themed boutique hotel’; a complete disregard for the rich heritage of one of the UK’s finest cultural and historical assets, and for its rightful function as a bell foundry. More details on this shameful proposal can be found here.

Our sister organisation Factum Foundation have partnered with the United Kingdom Historic Preservation Trust on a plan to re-open the foundry, re-equipped for the production of bells and art casting once again, which can be read in full here. You can help save the Whitechapel Bell Foundry by taking a moment to submit an objection to the boutique hotel proposal to the Tower Hamlets council. Information on how to do so can be found here.


Shirazeh Houshiary's 'The Oracle' (2018)
Shirazeh Houshiary's 'The Oracle' (2018)

'The Oracle' began life as a 3D model provided by Shirazeh Houshiary; this gave the basis of its materialisation as a metal structure, that after several tests, was perfected, sanded-down, and hand painted.

The result is two snaking slender forms that twist in between each other; the resulting mixture of curves and turns creates an apparent harmony between the starkly opposing colours.

This sculpture was shown as part of Lehmann Maupin’s solo presentation of Houshiary's work at the inaugaral Frieze Art Fair LA, which ran from 15th to 17th February 2019.

More information on the production process behind this piece here.


Split Stone (7:34) by Sarah Sze
Split Stone (7:34) by Sarah Sze

Factum has collaborated with Sarah Sze on a two-part sculpture entitled ‘Split Stone (7:34)’, comprised of a natural boulder split in two like to a geode. The cut reveals a vivid image of the sky embedded into the surface of the stone.

By recording images in pixels and then fixing them in stone and pigment, Sze explores the fragility of time passing and our desire for weight and permanence in the face of both overwhelming natural forces and the ubiquitous images that surround us daily.

This work was installed at the National Roman Museum (Crypta Balbi) in Rome to coincide with Sze’s solo exhibition at the city's Gagosian Gallery (21st November 2018 - 27th January 2019).

Learn more here.
Image © Matteo D'Eletto, M3 Studio


Paolina Borghese at the V&A's Cast Courts
Paolina Borghese at the V&A's Cast Courts

Three statues created by Factum Arte, resulting from the recording of Antonio Canova's 'Paolina Borghese as Venus Victrix' in 2013, have been officially unveiled at the reopening of the V&A Museum's famed Cast Courts, which took place on December 1st 2018. Whilst the bright white edition is a 3D stereolithographic printed resin painted white, the other two versions were both cast glass and plaster using moulds produced directly from a 3D print.

Read more about the facsimiles here.


Ahmad Angawi at the British Museum
Ahmad Angawi at the British Museum

For his first collaboration with Factum Arte, Ahmad Angawi decided to realize a series of Mangour Screens, now exhibited permanently at the British Museum as part of the new Albukhary Foundation Gallery of the Islamic World, launched in October 2018.

These Mangour Screens reflect the great connection existing between digital and traditional craftsmanship and celebrate the ancient Islamic principles and rich cultural diversity Angawi was inspired by.

Click here to learn more.

© Image Courtesy of Ahmad Angawi


Boris Savelev's Chernowitz portfolio

Using the specialist flat-bed printer available in our Madrid workshop, much of Savelev’s modern work is printed on gesso-coated aluminium; a material that complements the deep shadows present in his work as well as the multiple tonal layers involved in their production, with the photographer personally involved in every print himself.

Click here to see the complete portfolio.


Set design for the opera <i>The Magic Flute</i>
Set design for the opera The Magic Flute

Michael Hansmeyer has collaborated with Factum Arte to create the set design of Romeo Castellucci’s The Magic Flute / Die Zauberflöte, presented this week at the Théâtre Royal de La Monnaie de Munt in Brussels.

Hansmeyer's piece is a significant example of computational architecture, showing the conversion of a geometry model into a monumental physical object. This new project testifies to the atmosphere of Factum Arte's workshop, that of a playground with a plurality of artistic possibilities, and embodies our obsessive commitment to pushing the boundaries that usually separate technology and craft skills. Learn more.


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